Komura-Weber Memorandum concerning Korea, 1896

Memorandum.
The Representatives of Russia and Japan at Keijo (Seoul) having conferred under the identical instructions from their respective governments have arrived at the following conclusions:

1) While leaving the matter of His Majesty's (the Koeran King) return to the palace entirely to his own discretion and judgement the Representatives of Russia and Japan will friendly advise His Majesty to return to that palace, when no doubts concerning his safety there could be entertained.
The Japanese Representative, on his part, gives the assurance, that the most complete and effective measures will be taken for the control of Japanese soushi.

2) The present Cabinet ministers have been appointed by His Majesty from his own free will and most of them held ministerial or other high offices during the last two years and are known to be liberal and moderate men.
The two Representatives will always aim at recommending to His Majesty to appoint liberal and moderate men as ministers and to show clemency to his subjects.

3) The Representative of Russia quite agrees with Representative of Japan that at the present state of affairs in Corea it may be necessary to have Japanese guards stationed at some places for the protection of the Japanese telegraph line between Fusan and Seoul, and that these guards, now consisting of three companies of soldiers, should be withdrawn as soon as possible and replaced by gendarmes, who will be distributed as follows:
fifty men at Taiku, fifty men at Hamheung and ten men each at ten intermediate posts between Fusan and Seoul.
This distribution may be liable to some changes, but the total number of the gendarme force shall never exceed two hundred men, who will afterwards gradually be withdrawn from such places, where peace and order has been restored by the Corean Government.

4) For the protection of the Japanese settlements at Seoul and the open ports against possible attacks by the Corean populace, two companies of Japanese troops may be stationed at Seoul, one company at Fusan and one at Gensang, each company not to exceed two hundred men.
These troops will be quartered near the settlements and shall be withdrawn as soon as no apprehension of such attack could be entertained.

For the protection of the Russian Legation and Consulates the Russian Government may also keep the guards not exceeding the number of Japanese troops at those places and which will be withdrawn as soon as tranquillity in the interior is completely restored.